David J. Finton

I bought “The No Nonsense Trumpet From A – Z” because I was impressed by the helpful posts which Pops has made to the newsgroup rec.music.makers.trumpet–often excerpts from this book. I was happy to find that the book is a comprehensive synthesis of just about everything relating to trumpets and the basics of trumpet playing. It’s not a slick packaging of one player’s special techniques. Instead, Pops discusses and compares various approaches and types of equipment. Neither is this book a collection of nice-sounding theories; Pops has mastered the techniques he teaches, and carefully researched his material. His approach is always practical. The sections of the book which have been the most helpful to me personally were the discussions of mouthpieces, and especially, embouchure. I’ve often been confused by the different descriptions of embouchure I read by top players. They describe what works for them, but Pops has mastered all […]

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Bob Dumon

When I returned to playing trumpet after a 35 year layoff, the first thing I did was look on the Internet to see what helpful information might be available there. As I expected, I found a multitude of web sites, newsgroups, and other services where all kinds of helpful tips and playing techniques were explained in detail. Some of the information I found extremely valuable. Many well-intentioned people were quick to provide answers to many of my questions, and I found the sage wisdom and advice communicated by Clint ‘Pops’ McLaughlin to be particularly helpful. I thought the “on line lessons” from ‘Pops’ were extremely useful in facilitating my quick return to playing again, and I truly feel ‘Pops’ advice has actually helped me surpass my ability of many years ago. The lessons I most appreciated from him were on the subjects of: Embouchures – ‘Pops’ not only understands a […]

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Carl Dershem

I’ve been a pro brass player for nearly 25 years, and have been on-line for about 12, and reading “Pops’” advice on-line over the past years have made him one of the few people in the trumpet forum whose posts I always read and consider. His tips and advice are always well thought out, useful, and lacking in the emotionalism, personal bias and hyperbole that are so common on the net. Not that he doesn’t have his own personal preferences – but that he labels them as such, recognizes the fact that all players are different, and then gets on to the business at hand. He’s definitely an experienced player and teacher, and a resource to be valued. Carl Dershem

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Jeanne G Pocius

I recently purchased copies of *Pops*’s books, and have taken a bit of time to peruse them before posting to the list…. Clint McLaughlin has distilled a lifetime of knowledge into these volumes–_PRACTICAL_ knowledge which deserves to be put into use in every trumpeter’s practice room/studio. While I can’t say that I agree with EVERY approach he advocates (I’m not an advocate, for example, for thrusting the lower jaw forward because I believe the potential tension caused by this technique outweighs the benefits of it), I CAN and DO agree with most of what he recommends…. This is not a book of theories or generalities, but a real resource designed BY a trumpet player FOR trumpet players. The exercises have real merit, and the *Trumpet FAQ*’s are PRICELESS! (talk about distilling decades of individual lessons into a single text!) Don’t waste any more time searching for the *ultimate guide to […]

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Stanton K

I think your knowledge is first rate and I have personally benefited in many ways. A couple of days ago, you gave an explanation about “air projection”. Until the explanation, it didn’t really make sense. I have since been able to utilize the concept to aid in taking the stress off the chops. If I can only now learn to utilize it subconsciously. Additionally, one of the best tips I ever got from you was how to control timbre with the shape of the aperture. I use it often. Regards, SK

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John Julian

Your books have wealth of information that most of us “old guys” had to search for for days, weeks, months to get. All the historical material is great, all the air and chops instruction is right on…just like Jake would’ve done it, I think, and that’s a high compliment! I, as do many trumpet players, appreciate having so much material readily available as “one-stop-shopping!” John Julian

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