How do you practice the Arban, Clarke & Schlossberg?

The Complete Arban is broken into sections: First studies from pages 11-22 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Syncopation 23-36 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Slurs 39-56 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Scale studies 59-87 (Play 2 pages daily for a week) Turns,trills,shakes….. 91-122 (Play 2 pages daily for a week) Intervals,Triplets & sixteenth notes 125-141 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Chords 142-152 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Triple Tonguing 155-174 (Play 1 page daily for a week) Double & Applied Tonguing 175-190 (Play 1 page daily for a week) After some of the smaller sections of the Arban are complete and you are used to this you can start working on : One of the 14 Characteristic Studies Pages 285-299 and/or One of the 12 Fantaisies & variations pages 301-347.   Clarke Technical Studies is broken into 10 lessons: You […]

Continue reading

Playing every day

When I play every day my tone starts getting airy and I can’t play soft. You have described what happens when one plays a spread embouchure. Playing TOO loud, TOO high (for your muscle development), TOO long and using MPC pressure. If you keep going it WILL get worse. Take 2-3 days off. Don’t let a mouthpiece touch your lips. Lip buzz for those 3 days. (This will help you to overcome the spread chop setting.) When you start playing again play everything soft. Practice to see how soft you can play. (Again this helps to prevent a spread setting and works on range). A very soft middle C has the same aperture size as a loud High C. Therefore you can practice making smaller apertures without the damage associated with range work. Work on Clarke Technical Study #1. Stay below Middle C. Just use the Low F# to Middle […]

Continue reading

Pedals and Systamatic Approach

It has been suggested by some that there is no chance of causing any lip damage by using pedal tones. Pedals are used to help loosen the lips. To play a double pedal C the lips vibrate freely and they are very relaxed. This is a good thing. Lets look at the directions in THE building range through pedals book. “Systematic Approach to Daily Practice for Trumpet” Part 1 is the main pedal exercise. The directions are. 1. Big Breath. 2. Do not hold back. 3. Hold the note as long as possible with a crescendo at the end. Hold the note until all air is gone and longer (until your stomach shakes). Relaxing the lips to their fullest extent then playing without holding back adding a crescendo. The day Jack posted the first Pedal post I read an email from a TPIN list member. He was writing to ask […]

Continue reading

Is the Arban the only book you need?

The Arban book is talked about as being the Trumpet Bible. That implies a kind of completeness. This is simply not the case. There are some good exercises but there is also a great deal of space devoted to younger players. A lot of both the Art of phrasing and the duets is easily mastered. There is NO range work in the English versions. The multiple tonguing is on a basic level. And A great deal of the last 50 pages is also simple. Lets face it a lot of High School players take the Carnival of Venice to solo contest or college auditions. The book NEEDS a great deal of suppliments. Bartold Orchestral Excerpts Vol. 1-5 Burke New Directions in Tonguing Clarke Technical Studies Clarke Characteristic Studies Schlossberg Daily Drills Williams Complete Method (Lots of great works in Vol. III) Williams Supplimental Studies Williams Transposition Williams Secret of Technique […]

Continue reading

Learning paralysis

For some reason (unknown to me) some players refuse to allow themselves to play the trumpet. I’ve seen this hundreds of times over many years. When we learn to use a fork someone shows us how to hold it. For several days / weeks we concentrate on the process. And after a small level of mastery we let go of the “DETAILS” and simply use the fork. We repeat this same process thousands of times during our lives. The very first attempt at a physical action requires thought. However after doing that action many times muscle memory can and should take over. We all know people who can’t swim. Swimming is taught sometimes in a series of steps. (Like trumpet playing) You first get to the point where you can float. Then a glide action is learned. This is using the legs as you float. And finally the arms are […]

Continue reading

Warm up

What is your warm up? A warm up needs to accomplish 4 things. 1. It needs to get the lips vibrating to produce both a good tone and flexibility. 2. It needs to get the breathing process / breath support working properly. 3. It needs to get the tongue working on single and multiple tonguing applications. 4. It needs to get the fingers to work with the lips, breath, and tongue. Jacoby used to start a lesson by having the student bend as far forward as possible and breathe with his mouth open (yawning). This helped to relax and open the throat. Next a second line g was played until the tone came clear and free. On a good day it took 15 seconds on a bad day as long as it takes. Then a scale from the center out by half steps. G, G#, F#, A, F, A#, E, […]

Continue reading