What about buzzing?

Well there are several right answers about the topic of “Do we buzz when we play?” I know some good players who can NOT free buzz. I know some good players who can NOT free buzz very well. I know some good players who can buzz. First there is a vibration setup in the air in the tubing of the trumpet. And that vibration is responsible for the sound that we hear. Now how does that vibration start? If we wrap our lips around the leadpipe and blow all we get is a hiss. We can hear the air move but there is no vibration or tone. So then the lips have a part to play in this. Players who can NOT free buzz need to get feedback inorder to produce a trumpet sound. This feedback is from the return of the waveform that they blew into the mouthpiece. They […]

Continue reading

I’ve been buzzing 30 min to an hour a day for 6 months & my low register is tight

That is way too much buzzing. Most people buzz to learn a close aperture lip setting and for a little lip strength. That takes weeks not years. If you can buzz a double c then you should be able to play a triple c. There are a couple of reasons why you can’t. 1. Too muscle based. Air is the # 1 tool of a brass player. 2. Compression + compression + mouthpiece pressure = NO aperture for the air to go through. Basicly the tight muscular chops create such a small lip aperture that any other help closes and seals them. The pressure needed for a seal between the lips and the mouthpiece is not a lot but it WILL have some affect on the lips. Added to that the air column needed to play high is trying to blow the chops open. This actually blows them forward and […]

Continue reading

3 types of buzzing

Why lip buzz or mpc buzz or leadpipe buzz.¬†What is the difference. Besides I heard that a study showed we don’t have to buzz. Many great teachers advocated lip and or mouthpiece buzzing (to certain students). They are used as exercises and to teach a certain concept. After the idea is understood the buzzing is stopped. Leadpipe buzzing has more to do with AIR-flow while lip buzzing deals with Strength, range and a close embouchure setting. Mouthpiece buzzing is normally to work on a dynamic embouchure rather than static one. So that your embouchure can always adjust and shift registers as you play. Strength exercises are short lived so as NOT to impede lip flexibility. AIR exercises are forever. FWIW we’ve known since the early 60’s that there is a standing wave setup in the tubing of the trumpet. I first read Schilke’s report in 73 or 74. The fact […]

Continue reading

Free lip buzzing

Well there are several right answers about the topic of “Do we buzz when we play?” I know some good players who can NOT free buzz. I know some good players who can NOT free buzz very well. I know some good players who can buzz. First there is a vibration setup in the air in the tubing of the trumpet. And that vibration is responsible for the sound that we hear. Now how does that vibration start? If we wrap our lips around the leadpipe and blow all we get is a hiss. We can hear the air move but there is no vibration or tone. So then the lips have a part to play in this. Players who can NOT free buzz need to get feedback inorder to produce a trumpet sound. This feedback is from the return of the waveform that they blew into the mouthpiece. They […]

Continue reading

Buzzing is exercise

In your playing you use the tongue to make a close aperture for playing. It does a lot of the same things as a close lip aperture. I personally find the close lip setting gives me more endurance. Buzzing is NOT exactly about playing. It is a way to learn to use a close lip aperture. Your example about nonbuzzers getting a bad sound if they try a buzzing embouchure is right. There are a couple of reasons here. 9 times out of 10 you aren’t really buzzing like you play. Instead you have formed a NEW embouchure. You buzz that new embouchure and it sounds bad. Given some time it clears up. It is using the muscles in a different way. It may be easier for you to buzz if you put your lips together play a note and very slowly start removing the mouthpiece. The sudden loss of […]

Continue reading

Embouchure, buzzing and pedals

The use of pedals can have benefits. But it is NOT the fastest, or most natural way to do an embouchure change. Lip buzzing (no mouthpiece just the lips) will ALLOW the lips to assume the position that THEY want to be in when they play. Learning to play the way your body naturally wants to will really improve your playing. You no longer FIGHT your bodies natural tendencies but learn to work with them. To learn to turn a lip buzz into a real embouchure work on sneaking the buzz onto the horn. Buzz your lips and while buzzing gently bring the horn into playing position. This will produce a note through your horn. Continue to play until you need a breath. Then remove the horn from your lips, take a breath, buzz and sneak it back into position. Do this for every breath until the embouchure setting becomes […]

Continue reading